This week’s McDaniel Short-Cut recipe, Fall Farro Salad, includes delicious seasonal vegetables and quick cooking farro from Trader Joe’s. Farro, an ancient grain, is rich in fiber and other nutrients such as magnesium and zinc. This Trader Joe’s farro only takes 10 minutes to cook from start to finish compared to traditional farro which takes around 30 minutes. It’s a whole-grain lifesaver for a busy family trying to throw a quick meal together. While you can certainly eat this fall farro salad warm, it also makes for a delicious room temp or cold salad. Chilling whole grains such as farro develops something called a resistant starch.

What Are Resistant Starches?

Resistant starches resist being broken down like other carbohydrates; instead, they are fermented in the large intestine and act as a prebiotic. Resistant starches can be found in beans, peas, lentils, green bananas, raw potatoes, raw oats, and cooked and cooled rice and grains. 

Benefits of Resistant Starches: Fall Farro Salad 

 

  • Improved gut health. Many people have begun taking a probiotic supplement which contain live bacteria and yeast to improve your digestive system function. Prebiotics function as food for this good bacteria. 
  • Blood sugar control. Since resistant starches are not broken down for energy, they do not raise blood sugar levels. This can improve insulin sensitivity over time. 
  • Increased satiety. Resistant starch is considered a type of fiber, and therefore it helps to keep you full longer. Increased satiety leads to higher levels of weight loss. 
  • Lowers risk for colon cancer 

Tips to Eat More Resistant Starches Beyond This Fall Farro Salad! 

  1. Add beans or lentils into soups, salads, and casseroles.
  2. Stir in 1-2 T. raw potato starch into your smoothie or yogurt each day. 
  3. Cook your rice, pasta, and other grains ahead of time and let them cool in the refrigerator overnight.
  4. Incorporate uncooked oats into your favorite protein ball recipe.

Whether you’re trying to add more fiber into your diet or improve your overall gut health, adding one resistant starch per day is a manageable place to start. As your body becomes accustomed to the extra fiber, you can gradually increase the amount until you reach the recommended fiber intake of 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. Your digestive system (and overall health) will thank you!

 

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

Fall Farro Salad with Sweet Potatoes, Brussels Sprouts & Dried Cherries


  • Author: Jennifer McDaniel
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 8 1x

Ingredients

Scale

Farro Salad

  • 3 T. olive oil, divided
  • 1 large or 2 small sweet potatoes, cubed
  • 2 c. quartered Brussels Sprouts
  • 1 c. dried cherries
  • 1/4 c. toasted pumpkin seeds
  • 8.8 oz (249 g) bag Trader Joe’s 10-minute farro

Lemon Shallot Vinaigrette

  • 1/2 c. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 c. extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 T. honey
  • 1 large shallot
  • 1 T. dijon mustard
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1/2. t. pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Place brussels sprouts and sweet potato on a lined baking sheet and coat with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes or until Brussels are slightly charred.
  4. Meanwhile, cook the farro according to package instructions.
  5. Once all ingredients are ready, in a large bowl combine farro, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, dried cherries and pumpkin seeds.
  6. In a small bowl combine lemon juice, olive oil, honey, shallot, and dijon mustard and blend with an immersion blender or blender.
  7. Top dressing onto salad. You will have extra dressing.
  8. Serve warm or cold, depending on preference.
  • Category: Salad
  • Method: Roast

Keywords: Farro Salad with Brussels Sprouts and Sweet Potatoes

Jennifer McDaniel

Jennifer McDaniel is a Registered Dietitian, Media Spokesperson, and co-author of Prevention's Mediterranean Table Cookbook. She and her team of Registered Dietitians aim to help their clients go further, make change last, and unlock their potential. She lives in St. Louis, MO with her husband, and three young sons. If you are interested in working with Jennifer, please visit our contact page.